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24Aug/170

Passing multi-value report parameters to SSRS using the URL querystring

Passing parameters to reports in SSRS using the URL can be really helpful, especially when you want to link to a report with some of the data aleady filled out. We had an email alert that some accounts in active directory were incorrect, and we wanted a way to link to a report that provided some additional detail for those accounts. Querystring parameters aren't very well documented (and I couldn't find anything on multi-value parameters), and I hope this saves you some time if you're in the same situation.

There's a pretty good reference on Technet, but it's got some gaps (for me, the biggest was even mentioning multi-value/multi-select parameters). The basic syntax is pretty straightforward - normally, a report is called with a URL like the following:

http://YourSsrsServer/Reports/Some%20Folder/YourReportName

From there, you can select the parameters and run the report. To provide a link to the report with the parameters already filled out (if they're blank or if you gnat to override the defaults), just append this to the end of the URL:

?ReportParam1=SomeValue&ReportParam2=SomeOtherValue

You can pass any type of parameter with this same syntax - text, datetime, integer, float, or boolean (use Yes/No). Your full url would look like this:

http://YourSsrsServer/Reports/Some%20Folder/YourReportName?ReportParam1=SomeValue&ReportParam2=SomeOtherValue

To do a multi-value parameter, you repeat the name of the parametr to provide it multiple values:

http://YourSsrsServer/Reports/Some%20Folder/YourReportName?ReportMultiParam=SomeValue&ReportMultiParam=SomeOtherValue

If this is the only parameter on the report and it doesn't need any other user input, the report will automatically execute because it has everything it needs. If you want the report to wait for the user to hit "View Report", you need to leave at least one parameter empty.

Two quick notes if you're having trouble:

  • Use the parameter name, not the prompt text. If your parameter is called "Office" but the prompt says "Which office?", use "Office". Parameter names aren't always intuitive and you may need to open the report in Visual Studio to get these names if you can't guess them.
  • In the same way, you need to use the field's value, not the label. If the dropdown contains the full name of the office, but the value behind the list is the office number, you'll need to provide the numbers on the querystring.

Good luck!

10Jan/170

Microsoft Connect item for an SSRS pre-report canvas

Current state:

About six months ago, I submitted a connect request for SQL Server (my first one) to suggest an improvement to the SSRS interface - a customizable canvas that's displayed before an SSRS report renders, while parameters are being entered. My issue was that there was information I wanted report users to have (like expected wait time, suggestions for the parameters, the report title and a short description that might help them, etc.) and there was no way to get it to them.

With a giant empty screen staring at them, it seemed like a great place to add that information:

SSRS Report pane current layout

The suggestion:

Ideally, while the user is considering parameters, I'd love to see something like this (ignoring that it's not a super-photogenic report):

proposed-layout

This would be a great place for details about the report that help the user before (or while) they run it, like:

  • The name of the report (not always clearly visible in the URL or browser title bar, especially when you're Sharepoint-integrated. Especially helpful if they've left multiple report tabs open or if report generation fails, they're often left with a white screen and no easy way to tell the tabs apart.
  • A short description of the report, including when you'd use it or any notable caveats.
  • An estimated runtime - this isn't always possible exactly as parameters vary, but even a general estimate (or better yet, an average or a 95% confidence range, pulled from the report server database) would be better than the complete blank they get today.
  • Suggestions/restrictions on the parameters - If a report can't be run for all offices at once, you can say so here. If running it for everybody at once means you can't export to Excel because it's too large, let the user know.
  • A mock-up/screenshot of the report - so they user can see if it's the one they want. They may be looking for a report with a specific chart, and waiting for 3 minutes for each one to render may not be ideal.
  • A link to any other documentation/resources, or related reports, or pretty much anything else.

It wouldn't need to be anything fancy - I'd even settle for text you can format, or some kind of additional panel on the report that you can design, but isn't rendered with the report itself. Access to data (to pull estimated on execution times or dynamic owner/description details, for example) would be nice, but not required - I'd rather have a design-only, no-data canvas than nothing at all.

The plea:

t-sql-tuesdayThanks to the motivation from the folks at Brent Ozar Unlimited, I'm asking for your help in voting for this suggestion (if you think it would be beneficial, of course). As part of T-SQL Tuesday, they've asked people to find a connect request that they'd like to see filled and post about it, so here I am asking humbly for your support. : )

If you like the idea, please vote for it - if you don't, please comment and let me know why not (I'm always open to understanding the opposition). There are a ton of great Connect items out there and this is only one, but I think it would help out (especially for our longer-running reports).

Thanks for your help!

Direct URL for the Connect item: https://connect.microsoft.com/SQLServer/feedback/details/2809098/ability-to-customize-report-splash-screen-during-parameter-submission

Side note:

I've attached the two images (current/proposed) to my connect item three different times and they're still not showing up there - if anybody knows how to get those images published, people can see what I'm talking about when I describe my suggestion! : )